The Chess Report(s) Card
September 27, 2008
There are a gazillion books on openings. Most of them try to tell you the best move to play in a given variation or position.  But do you know what to do if your opponent doesn’t play the best move? Test yourself! Find the best moves in the following quiz:.


(1) Buckley,Mark - Burkett,Max [A21]
CalChess Masters, Berkeley, 1983
1.c4 e5 The English Opening. 2.Nc3 Bb4 3.Nf3 Bxc3 4.dxc3 f6 5.g3 b6 6.Bg2 Bb7 7.0-0 Ne7 8.Qc2 0-0 
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White to Move


(2) Brujic,Bozidar - Asanin,Z [B06]
Bela Crkva op, Bela Crkva, 1983
1.d4 d6 2.e4 Nd7 3.Nc3 g6 4.Nf3 Bg7 The Modern Defense. 5.Bc4 h5
page18.2.jpg

White to Move


(3) Lane,Gary - Flesch,Janos [B22]
Lloyds Bank open, London, 1983
1.e4 c5 2.c3 The Sicilian Defense Alapin Variation. 2...d5 3.exd5 Qxd5 4.d4 e6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.Be2 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.c4 Qf5 9.Nc3 Rd8 [9...cxd4 A much better move.] 
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White to Move


(4) Pillsbury,Harry Nelson - Fernandez [C25]
Paris simultaneous, Paris, 1900
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.f4 The Vienna Game. 3...d6 4.Nf3 a6 5.Bc4 Bg4 6.fxe5 Nxe5 
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White to Move


(5) Smith,Stephen - Cohn,Erich [C44]
Germany, 1902
1.e4 e5 2.d4 The Danish Gambit. 2...exd4 3.c3 d5 4.exd5 Qxd5 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.Nxd4 Nxd4 7.cxd4 Nf6 8.Nc3 Bb4 
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White to Move


(6) Capablanca,Jose Raul - Adams,Edward [C46]
Skittles, Washington, DC, 1909
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 The Three Knights. 3...Bc5 4.Nxe5 Nxe5 5.d4! The usual antidote. 5...Bxd4 6.Qxd4 Qf6 [6...d6 is to be preferred.] 7.Nb5 Kd8 
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White to Move


(7) White - Black [D08]
A classic Albin win, Timaru (11)
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 d4 4.e3 Bb4+ 5.Bd2 dxe3 6.a3? A classic loser in the Albin Counter Gambit. [6.fxe3 This is better, but it leaves White's pawns a mess.]
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Black to Move


(8) Miles,EJ - Gyles,Alfred [D50]
New Zealand Championship, Napier, 1912
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 A Queen's Gambit. 4.Nf3 c5 5.Bg5 cxd4 6.Qxd4 Be7 7.cxd5 exd5 8.Bxf6 Bxf6 9.Qxd5? 
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Black to Move


(9) White - Black [C77]
Noah's Ark Trap
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 A Ruy Lopez. 3...a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.Nc3 [5.0-0 Probably the most common, but 5. Nc3 is okay if White follows up correctly.] 5...d6 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 [7.dxe5 Considered "best."] 7...exd4 8.Nxd4? 
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Black to Move


(10) Oskam,Gerard - Euwe,Max [D03]
The Hague, 1919
1.d4 d5 2.Bg5 Queen's Pawn Trompowsky. 2...Bf5 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.c4 h6 6.Bxf6 Qxf6 7.Qb3 Nc6? Now the house falls down. Black will be a future world champion! 8.Qxb7 Kd7 
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White to Move


(11) White - Black [C56]
Two Knights Defense Trap, The Hague
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.0-0 Bc5 The infamous Max Lange Attack! 6.e5 d5 7.exf6 dxc4 8.Re1+ Be6 9.Ng5 Qxf6?
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White to Move


(12) White - Black [A52]
The Budapest Gambit, The Hague
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5 The Budapest Gambit. 3.dxe5 Ng4 4.Bf4 Bb4+ 5.Nd2 Nc6 6.Ngf3 Qe7 7.a3 Ngxe5 8.axb4? Why would Black give up his Bishop so easily?
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Black to Move


The positions were provided by Bob Long of Thinker’s Press (www.chessco.com ). When you have all 12 answers (and follow-up moves), send them to: gpetersen@uschess.org. We’ll have a drawing and choose five correct entries to receive The Chess Reports, First Semester, a 13-week series of online chess lessons.